Last Shangri-La

Collection of nerd-gasms.

I geek out over: books and libraries, Harry Potter, race and gender issues, microbiology, engineering, biotechnology, and photography.
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Roseau, the capital of Dominica

Caribbean Sea

thefaultinourspoons:

drejofvalenwood:

thefaultinourspoons:

This is basically a post for people who think that the world is accessible for those who are disabled, although this is centred around those who use a wheelchair. 

And this doesn’t include when people park in disabled spaces without a badge, or question those who park in disabled spaces who don’t use a chair.

The first picture is of a disabled parking space, where the snow has been pushed into that space whilst people were clearing the car park. This also happens when snow ploughers push the snow to the side of the road and onto the pavement as it blocks the dipped down pavement where wheelchair users can get on/off of the pavement and most wheelchairs struggle to be able to push through the snow.

The second picture is of a lift/elevator in Boots a store in the UK, where there are baskets and cases in front of the lift, which block wheelchair users from using it and accessing other levels in the store.

The third picture is of a zebra crossing with a lowered pavement for wheelchair users, and there is an island in the middle with a normal height curb, which blocks wheelchair users, and it means they have to go around, along with having bollards near the entrance which don’t look wide enough to fit a wheelchair through.

The fourth picture is that of a ramp, which has a step in order to get onto the ramp. (I’m pretty sure they didn’t even try.)

The fifth picture is of a ramp with a tree in the middle, which doesn’t have enough room on either side for a wheelchair to get through.

The sixth picture is of a very very steep ramp, which even if you have someone pushing your chair you probably won’t be able to get up it!

The seventh picture is of a disabled parking space, which has a ramp leading to the entrance, which again has steps in order to access the ramp.

The eighth picture is of ‘disabled parking’, where non of the spaces have room to allow chairs to get out of the car, except at the back. They are just normal spaces where a blue sign has been placed in an attempt to make the parking ‘wheelchair accessible’.

The ninth picture is of a reception desk which is too high for wheelchair users to access, as they can’t be seen, due to the fact that they are smaller than the desk.

The final picture is of a ramp which only goes halfway up the curb, essentially meaning there is a step at the top of the ramp.

If anybody still thinks the world isn’t staked against those who are disabled, then I honestly worry about you.

You make good points, but you can’t say the world is actively against the disabled. There are a good many buildings who need to accommodate for them, and some haven’t for a myriad of reasons. Some places’ll do the bare minimum to keep the law from breathing down their necks, but that’s all.

However, this doesn’t mean that the ‘world is staked against’ the disabled. Some places have really nice accomodations, and other places go above and beyond. Let’s try not to generalize.

People with disabilities are among the most marginalized groups in the world. WHO

83% of women with disabilities will be sexually abused in their lifetime bpvav

Children with disabilities are five times more likely to be abused bpvav

The amount of people with disabilities that drop out of Uni have doubled in a year the guardian

Goodwill pay their disabled employs less than a $1 per hour aljazeera

Families with a person with disabilities are more likely to live in poverty gov   twice as likely according to scope

Disabled people are less likely to be employed gov

Disabled people are three times less likely to have any qualifications, and are half as likely to have a degree gov

Over 25% of disabled people have said they don’t frequently have control of their own lives gov

Disabled people are more likely to experience discrimination at work than those who aren’t disabled gov

About a third of people with disabilities experience difficulties accessing public, commercial and leisure goods and services gov

About a fifth of disabled people have difficulties accessing public transport gov

Disabled people are more likely to be a victim of crime than non disabled people gov

1 in 3 households with a disabled person do not live in decent accommodation (this could be linked with the poverty statistic) gov

1 in 5 people with disabilities who need adaptations in their home believe their accommodation isn’t suitable

Disabled men make 11% less than non disabled men per hour, and women 22%

  • 38 per cent of people believe disabled people are a burden on society
  • 28 per cent of people believe there is Ill feeling around the perceived extra support given to disabled people (28 per cent
  • More than a quarter (27 per cent) of people think disabled people are treated differently because there is a lack of knowledge around disability
  • Nearly two-thirds (65 per cent) of people have admitted they avoid disabled people because they don’t know how to act around them
  • More than half (52 per cent) of people  assume disabilities are physical
  • Only 7 per cent  of people would consider mental disability when told that a person is disabled
  • Only 26 per cent of people class facial disfigurement as a disability
  • More than a third (34 per cnt) don’t consider hearing loss to be a disability.
  • One hundred and eighty disability hate crimes are committed every day in this country.
  • Fear and loss of confidence are the most common consequences of disability harassment.
  • Prosecutions and convictions for disability hate crime fell in 2011/12 after rising three years in a row – only partly due to fewer referrals from the police

efds

TLDR: disabled people do not have life handed to them on a plate, there are so many things that people could do to make our lives easier, but they don’t. things like the pictures above were a visual example, and the sad thing is, I found all these pictures on sites that stated they were hilarious. 

The world is staked against disabled people, and so are the people, and yes not everyone is, but stop implying that disabled people have it easy, but some of the world is actively against disabled people, and some of it isn’t, but when it comes down to it, disabled people have a hard time, and a lot have to fight for basic rights.

And I’m going to presume that you aren’t disabled, and I’m sorry for making an assumption, because I know better than anyone that invisible disabilities are all too common, so please don’t try to tell us what it’s like to live with a disability if you have no idea what it’s like yourself

(via aflyingcontradiction)

nprglobalhealth:

Taliban In Pakistan Derails World Polio Eradication

Last January Salma Jaffar was shot while she was going door-to-door in Karachi, giving children drops of the polio vaccine.

"Even when they took out the pistol, I couldn’t understand why he was taking out the gun," Jaffar says of the two men who pulled up on a motorcycle and started shooting at the vaccination team.

"But when he opened fire, that is when I thought it was the end of the life," she says. "My first thought was that I won’t be able to see my children again."

Jaffar was shot four times: twice in her arm and twice in her chest. She spent the next three weeks in an intensive care unit.

Three of her colleagues weren’t as fortunate and died in the attack. They are among the more than 60 polio workers who have been killed since the Pakistani Taliban banned polio immunization in 2012.

Today the militant group continues to threaten to kill not only vaccinators, but also parents who get their children immunized. That threat has had a chilling effect on anti-polio efforts nationwide. And it completely halted vaccination drives in some Taliban-controlled areas. It’s in these places that the crippling virus has come roaring back — and threatened to stymie global efforts to wipe out polio.

The worldwide campaign to eradicate polio has been going on for more than two decades. It has cost more than $10 billion. Now the success of the campaign hinges on whether Pakistan can control the virus.

At its peak in the 1950s, polio paralyzed about 350,000 people a year around the world. This year, so far, there have been only 128 cases recorded. Ninety-nine of them have been in Pakistan. And the South Asian nation is the only country in the world where the number of polio cases is rising significantly.

Continue reading.

Photo: A health worker gives a child the polio vaccine in Bannu, Pakistan, June 25. More than a quarter million children in Taliban-controlled areas are likely to miss their immunizations. (A Majeed/AFP/Getty Images)

Strangely, this bit was not included in the preview.

The edict by the Islamic militants to ban immunization was in response to the CIA’s setting up a fake hepatitis vaccination campaign in Pakistan. The covert operation was part of an attempt by the U.S. spy agency to verify whether Osama bin Laden was holed up in the city of Abbottabad.

The problem is that white people see racism as conscious hate, when racism is bigger than that. Racism is a complex system of social and political levers and pulleys set up generations ago to continue working on the behalf of whites at other people’s expense, whether whites know/like it or not. Racism is an insidious cultural disease. It is so insidious that it doesn’t care if you are a white person who likes black people; it’s still going to find a way to infect how you deal with people who don’t look like you. Yes, racism looks like hate, but hate is just one manifestation. Privilege is another. Access is another. Ignorance is another. Apathy is another. And so on. So while I agree with people who say no one is born racist, it remains a powerful system that we’re immediately born into. It’s like being born into air: you take it in as soon as you breathe. It’s not a cold that you can get over. There is no anti-racist certification class. It’s a set of socioeconomic traps and cultural values that are fired up every time we interact with the world. It is a thing you have to keep scooping out of the boat of your life to keep from drowning in it. I know it’s hard work, but it’s the price you pay for owning everything.

Scott Woods (X)

he motherfucking dropped the truth.

(via mesmerisme)

(via aflyingcontradiction)

fotojournalismus:

Airstrikes in Gaza | July 2014

1. An Israeli activist carries a placard during a protest against the war on the Gaza strip, in the Israeli city of Tel Aviv on July 9, 2014. (Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images)

2. Smoke and flames are seen following an Israeli air strike in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Reuters)

3. Palestinian relatives mourn during the funeral of members of Hamad family in the town of Beit Hanoun in the northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Mohammed Salem/Reuters)

4. Palestinians inspect the remains of a car which was hit in an Israeli air strike in Gaza City on July 9, 2014. (Ashraf Amrah/Reuters)

5. Relatives of eight Palestinian members from al-Haj family, who medics said were killed in an early morning air strike that destroyed at least two homes, mourn during their funeral in Khan Younis in the southern Gaza Strip on July 10, 2014. (Ibraheem Abu Mustafa/Reuters)

6. A picture taken in Gaza City on July 10, 2014 shows a damaged building after it was hit by an Israeli air strike. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

7. A Palestinian woman runs carrying a girl following an Israeli air strike on a house in Gaza city on July 9, 2014. (Majdi Fathi/Reuters)

8. Two boys stand near damage caused by Israeli warplanes in Gaza on July 10, 2014. (Yasser Qudih/NurPhoto/Corbis)

9. Israelis watch as smoke rises after air strikes across the border in northern Gaza on July 8, 2014. (Amir Cohen/Reuters)

10. A Palestinian boy plays in the rubble of a destroyed house the day after an Israeli strike in the town of Beit Hanoun, northern Gaza Strip on July 9, 2014. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

(via badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

jtotheizzoe:

Here’s some patriotic prokaryotes to wish you a happy 4th of July full of luminescent liberty!

These light-producing bacteria, known as Photobacterium leiognathi, are ocean-dwelling symbionts, bacteria that live on or within animals, getting protection from their hosts and giving them light-producing tissues in return. 

The anglerfish's glowing bait? That's bioluminescent bacteria. Same with the lanternfish, and certain glowing jellies. 

Thanks for the fireworks, nature!

(via Microbes Rule and Beatrice the Biologist)

(via scientificthought)

elusivelyshani:

I, too, sing America.

I am the darker brother.
They send me to eat in the kitchen
When company comes,…
But I laugh,
And eat well,
And grow strong.

Tomorrow,
I’ll be at the table
When company comes.
Nobody’ll dare
Say to me,
“Eat in the kitchen,”
Then.

Besides,
They’ll see how beautiful I am
And be ashamed—

I, too, am America

(via racialicious)